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    Pet Nutrition Myths Busted

    Check out common pet nutrition myths and resources for discovering the truth about what's best for your pet.

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    Corn Causes Food Allergies
    The truth is, corn does have nutritional value, and the higher grade of corn, the better. Corn, like beef and lamb, contains protein, so if your pet develops an allergy to protein, many of the main ingredients in the pet food may cause a reaction. Less than 10 percent of allergic skin conditions in animals, however, are caused by food.

    Homemade Pet Food Is Better Than Store-Bought Pet Food
    To determine the truth behind this myth, you can go to a trusted source, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). The AVMA discourages feeding pets a raw, homemade diet, due to the risk of improper cooking and pasteurization, which can lead to dangerous — even deadly — results for your pet. All store-bought pet food must meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, and many quality brands of pet food have spent years researching the proper amounts of various ingredients to give your pet quality nutrition.

    Table Scraps Are OK for My Pet
    Some foods — such as chocolate, onions and grapes — can send a pet to the emergency room or even cause death. If you purchase a quality brand of pet food, it will contain all the ingredients your pet needs for sound nutrition.

    You Don’t Have to Follow the Directions on the Pet Food Container
    It is important to give your pet the right amount of food in order for your pet to get the correct nutrients. Adding additional food or changing the amount of food your pet eats should be done only if recommended by your veterinarian.

    Store-Bought Pet Food Contains too Many Byproducts and Fillers
    All store-bought food goes through strict regulations and testing to determine the correct amount of nutrients. All of the ingredients in quality pet food are there to offer needed nutrients to your pet. Some people try to get consumers to believe that corn is a filler and not an ingredient, but this is not true. Corn offers nutritional value for your pet.

    Although there are many more myths out there about pet nutrition, always check with your veterinarian about what is best to feed your cat or dog. You can also check pet food websites for complete ingredient lists and additional nutritional information. If the pet food website doesn't have this information, consider going with a brand that's open and honest about their ingredients. Providing quality nutrition to your pet can lead to a longer, healthier life for your pet and your pocketbook.

    Enjoy this article? Learn more at Purina.com.

    Article provided by Purina

    Dollar General is not responsible for the content above and disclaims all liability therefrom. Dollar General does not sponsor, recommend or endorse any third party, product, service, or information provided on this site. All content provided herein is for educational purposes only. It is provided “as is” and as such, the accuracy of same is not warranted in any way. Such content is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the diagnosis, treatment and advice of a veterinarian. Such content does not cover all possible side effects of any new or different dietary program or skin/coat program for your pet. Consult your veterinarian for guidance before changing or undertaking a new diet or grooming plan.

    If your pet has dietary restrictions and/or allergies, always read the ingredient list carefully for all food or grooming products prior to using. Neither Triad Digital Media, LLC nor Dollar General make any representations as to the accuracy or efficacy of the information provided nor do they assume any responsibility for errors, omissions or contrary interpretation of the subject matter herein. Special written permission is required to reproduce in any manner, in whole or in part.

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